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Posts from the ‘digital marketing’ Category

A Layperson’s Guide to GDPR

June 13, 2018

jrlisk

GDPR-with-stars

 

If you are a marketer, publisher or digital business, GDPR probably makes you shutter. For the rest of you, it probably makes you shrug. Let’s quickly break it down, in plain English.

What is GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new regulation governing data protection and privacy in the European Union (EU). It went into effect Friday, May 25, 2018. Its goal is to give citizens more control over how their data is used. In the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica debacle, that’s a mission most people can get behind. But for marketers, publishers and vendors, it entails radical and expensive changes.

Even companies that are based outside of the EU have to abide by the new laws if they are offering good or services to EU citizens. That basically means every business in the world scrambled to become GDPR compliant.

What did GDPR change?

GDPR mandates that businesses be upfront about how they are using consumer data. If they are selling it to third-parties or using it for digital ad targeting, they need to tell you. Then, they have to obtain your consent. If a consumer doesn’t want their personal data used in a certain way, they can opt-out. GDPR also requires organizations that handle sensitive data on a large scale to appoint a data protection officer. Failure to comply results in massive fines, possibly as much as four percent of a company’s annual revenue.

There is a lot more to it then that. I have ghostwritten at least five articles about GDPR, but I still can’t pretend to know all the details. If you are really interested (or a masochist), read all about GDPR here.

To prepare for GDPR, companies leaned on their in-house legal counsel or hired outside experts. They often had to make massive changes to their privacy policies, compliance processes and in some cases, overhaul the way they use and store data, which can have massive implications for a business.

As a consumer, you probably noticed you received a lot of emails about updated privacy policies on or around 5/25, and that a lot of websites are serving popups with messages about how they use data.

What happens post-GDPR?

Execs around the world did a happy dance post 5/25. I don’t blame them, but at the risk of being a buzzkill, experts predict GDPR-related fallout as the industry adjusts to the legislation. Complaints have already been filed, and the finger-pointing has already begun. Some fear that GDPR will only strengthen the digital advertising duopoly, Google and Facebook, since smaller companies may not be able to afford the necessary changes, or to weather hefty fines.

Oh, and more changes are imminent. The ePrivacy regulation is in the works in Europe and US legislators are discussing the merits of the CONSENT Act, short for the Customer Online Notification for Stopping Edge-provider Network Transgressions act  (Now doesn’t that roll off the tongue?)

So, there you have it–an abbreviated overview of every marketer’s least favorite four-letter word, GDPR.

By Jacqueline Lisk

Photo cred: https://martechtoday.com/consent-unworkable-programmatic-ads-era-gdpr-209358

 

Why Your Business Needs Video

March 14, 2018

jrlisk

Businesses of all sizes are investing in video. Here’s why:

  • People prefer them. Research shows that 60% of site visitors will watch a video, if available, before reading text. (Source)
  • They are shareable. Content that includes a multimedia element is more likely to be shared than text-only content.
  • They are effective. After watching a video, 64% of users are more likely to buy a product online. (Source)
  • They are memorable. 80% of users recall a video they viewed in the last 30 days. (Source)
  • They bring your brand story to life.

Studios will charge 6-figure price tags for videos. We have an affordable approach to creating high-quality company videos that will make you jump for joy.

Here’s one we recently created for our client, Recruit Group.

Want to learn more? Contact info@jrlisk.com today, or fill out the form below.

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Infographic: The 2017 State of Content Marketing in the UK

May 16, 2017

jrlisk

Zazzle, a UK-based digital content marketing agency, surveyed thousands of businesses about their content marketing.

While 79 percent of those surveyed felt the use of content marketing is effective, only 6 percent were “definitely sure how to implement content marketing” strategies on their own. I’d wager a poll of American marketers and business owners would turn up similar findings.  (They usually do!) While most marketers are sold on content marketing’s merits, many still stumble when it comes to defining a strategy, creating quality content at scale, and measuring the results of their efforts.

Check out the Zazzle Media infographic below for more details.

By Jacqueline Lisk

Confessions of a Ghostwriter

July 26, 2016

jrlisk

Ghostwriter

Photo Credit: Allegra Laboratory

Lately, I’ve been doing a lot of ghostwriting. I pen thought leadership pieces for execs, and they run in major media outlets and industry trade pubs like AdExchanger, MediaPost, and TechCrunch. I also write articles for business leaders to share on LinkedIn, Medium, and company blogs. I love what I do, and I don’t do it “for the glory.” I like helping people convey their unique viewpoints. I like trying to capture their personality and cadence with my word choices. I genuinely enjoy working together to build on their ideas and to find examples to illustrate their points.

I agree wholeheartedly with a professional’s decision to hire someone like me, not just because it pays the bills, but because it’s a smart example of time management. People hire ghostwriters because they 1.) Don’t have the time to produce content themselves and/or 2.) Don’t have professional writing skills and understand that partnering with a pro will improve quality and, in turn, results.

But if I am honest, I sometimes wish I could share clips I’m particularly proud of, and I wonder how I can best showcase this type of writing, which has become a sizeable part of my business, on my social media channels and in my portfolio. Although many people enlist the help of a ghostwriter, it’s not usually something they want to advertise. I liked a solution proposed in Lauren Ingram’s article for Contently’s The Content Strategist, “Is it Morally Okay to Ghostwrite Thought Leadership.” She writes, “When some celebrities sign book deals for memoirs, co-writers are included in the byline, just in a smaller font. It might seem strange at first, but why couldn’t bloggers use this same system? Or at the very least, put some sort of disclosure at the bottom of the story to acknowledge the name of the person who actually wrote the post.” This solution would allow ghostwriters to share their work and help get their names out to potential new clients.

For the record, I have no moral qualms about what I do, or with the folks who ask me to do it. I work with clients who want my writing to sound like them. I take time to understand their position and personality. We communicate as often as necessary to make sure I am presenting their ideas and vision. Sure, I elaborate and improve as needed, but I don’t think there is anything unethical about that. (But I sure am glad I am not Tony Schwartz.)

This is a little cheesy, but I think it is an honor to have someone choose you for something so personal. Plus, I get to learn a lot about a ton of different industries and issues by speaking firsthand to industry leaders in ad tech, travel, and health care. It satisfies my innate curiosity and propensity for boredom in a way that other careers could not. I am proud of my ghostwriting. It’s not just about being a good writer, it’s about understanding your client and capturing his or her voice. I like the challenge. I like the work. Sure, I wouldn’t mind a byline here or there, but that (kinda vain) longing isn’t enough to take away from my love of the job or my appreciation for my clients.

By Jacqueline Lisk

What you don’t know about ad blocking

March 24, 2016

jrlisk

mrorobt

I can see all sides of the ad blocking conundrum. On one hand, we are fed up with obtrusive, irrelevant ads that interrupt our online experience. But then again, advertising subsidizes publishing. We need ads to monetize digital journalism. Plus, when used correctly, ads are a powerful marketing tool for raising brand awareness and driving conversions. But what I hadn’t thought about are the people and businesses behind the ad blocking solutions. Turns out, their mission isn’t always noble. It’s not just about protecting the user—it’s about profiting.

An increasing number of users are downloading tools that allow them to filter out ads. There are now more than 198 million people using ad blockers worldwide, and it cost the publishing industry nearly $22 billion in 2015, according to PageFair’s recent research. They are using this software because they’re concerned about privacy or security, or frankly, because ads can be annoying (enough with the pop-ups and auto-plays, people). I assumed the creators of ad blocking tools were akin to the protagonists in Mr. Robot—brilliant antiheroes brave enough to challenge the establishment. But at the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s (IAB) annual leadership meeting earlier this year, IAB President Randall Rothenberg explained that many of these ad blocking creators are for-profit companies that are using nefarious tactics to make a buck. They’ll actually allow publishers to pay a fee to circumvent ad blocking software, but if a digital site doesn’t have the means to “pay the toll,” they are out of luck! Rothenberg claims that this is actually a threat to freedom of speech and diversity. Slowly but surely, smaller, independent publications will be forced to close their doors (or laptops, if you will), and the only news sources remaining will be those with deep pockets. (Click here to read more about his speech.)

That there is a market for ad blockers speaks volumes about our industry, regardless of the intent of the software’s creators. (And hey, maybe there are some guys who are in this to improve and preserve the user experience. I can’t pretend to know everybody’s motives, but Rothenberg’s words resonated with me.) Marketers and publishers should see this as a wake-up call. We have to respect the user. We have to use the tools available to us (and believe me, there are plenty) to create relevant creative and to effectively target audiences so the right messages are reaching the right people at the right time.

By Jacqueline Lisk